Monthly Archives: February 2012

Tyree MacFarland’s Stained & Etched Glass

By Jim Hornsby… Tyree MacFarland’s artwork sparkles in the afternoon sunlight like diamonds in a jeweler’s showcase. I saw some pieces in the window of her shop on Belmont Boulevard and was compelled to stop in and learn more about it. From inside the shop, the stained and etched glass she displays is even more beautiful, taking on a special glow with the sunlight from behind. “Light is so important; such an integral part of my work,” Tyree explained. “With glass, the most important part is the light that comes through it.” Continue Reading

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Gazell Method Harmonicas

By P.T. Gazell… I’ve been a professional harmonica player for 39 years. When I began at age 19 there was only one harmonica brand that most of us knew about: Hohner. I played Hohners and endorsed them until 2005. That was the year I first heard about another German harmonica company that had been in business ten years longer than Hohner. That company is C. A. Seydel Sohne. Located in the Saxony region of Eastern Germany, Klingenthal has been the home of Seydel since 1847. Continue Reading

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Tully Walker’s Last Trial

Fiction by Jim Hornsby… I wasn’t there for Tully Walker’s last trial. I had a case over in McMinn County and was gone most of the day. All I know about it is what I read in the transcript later on. But I’m sure the transcript is correct. Yula May Johnson was the court reporter for that session, and if Yula May says that’s what they said, you can bet that’s what they said. And most of what they said doesn’t surprise me at all. Continue Reading

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Bookman Bookwoman Steps It Up

By Pamela Sherborne… Bookman Bookwoman bookstore has been located in the same small eclectic retail area of Nashville for more than 15 years and, for most of those years, little has changed for this independent, used and rare bookstore business. Of course, book titles changed as they rose in popularity and then waned. Continue Reading

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What Do You Know About Country Ham?

By Phil Sparks… Before the age of refrigeration, the local butchers sold fresh-cut pork only from freshly slaughtered hogs. Consumers had to buy, cook, and eat the pork right away. That system was okay in the city, but in the country, a single family often had to make a couple of hogs last all year. The pork had to be preserved, and the only way to preserve it was to “cure” it with salt. People have been curing pork for centuries, and no single cut has demanded as much loving attention as the cured ham, the right or left hindquarter of a hog. Continue Reading

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The Chestnut Square Art Co-op

by Jesse Mathison… Kuntal steps back, studying the lines and shape on the canvas, trying to find a balance of color. While his work is certainly not post-impressionistic, color very much plays its role. In this particular piece–a pastel portrait of Mohandas Gandhi–bold lines are emphasized by their rich color, shades of purple, yellow, and a metallic grey that is almost cobalt. Continue Reading

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Romeo, A Honker And A Spoon

By Diane Selser… Love. Sigh. I’ve had many unpleasant dates before the true Valentine of my life appeared. I met this particular specimen at a bar. I didn’t see the red flag. He asked me on a date. My two glasses of wine made me think he was a hottie patootee. I opened the door. There he was. His shiny polyester shirt was unbuttoned to his navel. My enlarged eyeballs were staring at a huge medallion on his hairy chest. Couldn’t back pedal on that one. Continue Reading

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